UEA United – Solidarity in the face of Brexit

Following last month’s disastrous referendum results (and no I won’t be pretending to be non-partisan about it) there has been a well-documented backlash against immigrants and anyone who doesn’t look quite British enough for the UKIP/Britain First brigade.

The awfulness of the referendum result and the resultant rise in hate crime is unfathomably horrific. If the UK is allowed to isolate itself and become the purely inward looking, bigoted nation that many Leave voters support the fallout will be manifold.

Not only does this new wave of racism harm many people, including UK citizens whose only crime is to not be ‘English’ enough, but also the country which the bigots claim to love.

From the point of view of the higher education sector, Brexit is disastrous. Large amounts of university funding come from the EU and it seems highly unlikely that the money gap will be filled by the current UK government. On top of this, UK universities’ reputations as being some of the best in the world attract bright minds from around the globe. When we pull up the drawbridge we close doors not only on funding but also the very people who are likely to be making the next great research breakthroughs. Already Cancer Research UK has warned that Brexit could cause a significant delay in the development of new cancer treatments.

Slightly closer to home for me is the knowledge that large chunks of the UEA student population are made up of international students, from the EU and beyond – including many of my friends.

The current cohort of international students, whether they are EU citizens or not, are being made to feel unwelcome in the country that they have chosen to study in and make their home. Future students will have to contend with not only the xenophobia licensed by Brexit but also the likely rise in tuition fees and a new need for visas. Not being able to afford studying in the UK will be a disappointment for many EU students but it will be a greater disaster for Britain which could see a considerable brain drain as young academics either don’t come here or are drawn away by the promise of better funding opportunities abroad.

Norwich voted to Remain, something that UEA and its students are immensely proud of.

When a local business owned by a Romanian family was attacked by arsonists following the Brexit vote, Norwich locals raised £24,000 to help the family repair their shop. Norwich is a designated city of refuge with a proud history of welcoming foreigners and those fleeing conflict elsewhere (please see this previous post for more on Norwich’s radical/ pro-refugee history) – most recently, the Norfolk council voted to offer homes to 50 Syrian families.

UEA continues this proud history of welcoming people from around the world by creating the UEA United campaign;

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“UEA welcomes students and staff from around the world. Whatever happens with Brexit our outlook remains global. EU and international students and staff will always be part of our family of nations. UEA is united.”

The staff and students wish all current and new international students to know that they are valued, they are welcome, and they are wanted.

At such a dark time in our country’s history it is a comfort to be a part of an institution which is unashamedly open and welcoming to all. We really are proud to ‘Do Different’.

So You’re About to Become a UEA Fresher?

It’s not that long until the dreaded results day now and I know that on top of worrying whether or not they’ve got the grades to get in a lot of students will be worried about moving to uni. Never fear, I am here to demystify the whole thing. So settle back, have a cup of tea, and I will tell you my top freshers’ tips.

1. What (Not) to Pack: If you are moving into student accommodation for your first year then you may be worrying about what you need to bring with you. My first piece of advice for all UEA freshers is COATHANGERS. I can’t speak for all the residences but they definitely aren’t included in Norfolk Terrace and you don’t want to be piling your clothes on the floor of your cupboard.

It’s also important to PACK FOR ALL SEASONS. When you depart for uni it might be autumnal sunshine but remember that you may not be going home before winter and Norfolk can get very chilly. If you’re a tea and coffee fanatic like myself then it’s a good idea to bring a KETTLE as not all of the flats have them and the queue at the campus shop is very long on the first day if you try to buy one when you get there. You don’t need to worry about bringing things like toasters, we have industrial size ones in the kitchens and you aren’t allowed them in your rooms.

Bring things that remind you of home and fill your room with your favourite things. Bring those books that you can read again and again, the DVDs that you watch when you’re feeling down, even your teddy bear if you still have one. These will all help you feel comfortable in your new home and will cheer you up if you get a spot of the freshers’ blues.

2. Decorate Your Room: When you first arrive your room will probably look a little sad and bare, but please don’t be put off. Once you’ve put your bedding on, added some books to the shelves and posters to the wall it will look completely different. It’s a good idea to pack some photos of your friends from home and bring knickknacks to put on the desk. It’s a great chance to really create your own space.

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The poster board in my Norfolk Terrace room

3. Arriving at Uni: Your arrival at uni can be a very chaotic affair with a dozen other people trying to move their large suitcases through a small flat at the same time as you, but this is your first opportunity to meet your new flatmates so try and conquer any potential nerves and say hi. Once you’re in your room and unpacking, prop your door open so people can pop their heads in and introduce themselves as they pass. Everyone else is new and wants to make friends too so make it as easy as possible for yourselves.

4. Which Freshers’ Events to go to: Firstly, be aware that lots of clubs will be trying to take advantage of Freshers’ week and they know that the incoming students don’t want to miss out on ‘Official’ freshers’ events – therefore be wary of people trying to sell you club wristbands and know that only tickets sold through the UEA Union website are genuinely official events. Personally, I’d only recommend bothering with the first week tickets but if clubbing is something you really enjoy then you can still buy tickets for the second week events once you arrive and find other people to go with.

Don’t forget to go to the Freshers’ fairs, you can get great coupons to use with local businesses and sign up to over 200 hundred societies (although I would not recommend signing up to all 200). I’ll be at the Societies Fair this year representing the Drama Society, so please come and say hi if you’re interested in the society or have any questions.

5. And Lastly: If you’re unsure about something ASK FOR HELP. There are lots of people on campus who would be happy to help you however you need it. There’s the Students Union who have a drop in service, the Dean of Students, your academic advisors, and older students who have been trained to mentor younger students. We’ve all be freshers once so we know how scary it can be, but we’re here to make your transition to uni as easy and enjoyable as possible.

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If you have any more questions (or your own freshers’ tips) then please feel free to ask here or contact me at h.armstrong@uea.ac.uk

I am also now on Instagram so (once September comes around) if you’d like a glimpse of what life for a UEA student is like then you can have a look at hjp_armstrong.

Best of luck to all the A Level students (including my little brother which makes me feel very old)!

Summer 2016 Plans

Hello Everyone,

Apologies that it’s been a little while but I’ve been out of the country for a bit (Florida to be precise) but now I am back, complete with sunburned feet.

Today’s blog is just to give you a little context for what I will be doing with my summer holiday, my FINAL summer holiday (!!!) before I head back to Norwich this September to start third year.

As I have opted to do a literature dissertation this autumn term I am currently surrounded by piles of books which require reading. I’ll try and keep giving updates about how my dissertation is progressing, both to give some context and advice for any other students reading but also to document for myself how it developed.

I won’t go into the details too much right now, but essentially I have had a think about what it was that I really enjoyed studying this last year, to which the answer is Medieval Writing and Romanticism. I was also advised by Karen Schaller, the Convenor of the English Literature BA, to look around at modules that I would like to have taken but can’t for whatever reason. This inspired to me have a root around the websites of other universities and see what final year modules they offer which I would have been interested in. The long and the short of it is that I’ve decided to research Medievalism, specifically Romantic Medievalism which is the 18th century reimagining of what the Middle Ages were like.

Looking back I realise that later interpretations of medieval life have always fascinated me. Even as a child my favourite books were historical fiction (I read The Other Boleyn Girl when I was 10 which on reflection was definitely too young!).

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The very beginnings of the dissertation research

On top of all this reading I also have an interview lined up at my local museum to see whether I can do some work experience with their admin team for a few weeks. As I think I have previously mentioned, I really enjoy doing the behind the scenes work for UEA Drama Society, but looking ahead to the future I think that I might be interested in doing similar work in the heritage sector. Fingers crossed they take me on, if nothing else it will keep my CV up to date and diverse.

And last but by no means least, I will of course be heading up to Edinburgh in August to take the show which I am producing (‘Death and the Data Processor’) to the Fringe Festival. More on that later!

As we are approaching A Level exam results I am aware that a lot of students will be anxiously waiting and worrying about life at uni. As always, if you have any question please feel free to comment on this post or email me at h.armstrong@uea.ac.uk

Best of luck!